☆ Read á The Mourning Wars by Karen Steinmetz ¼ myportal.pro

☆ Read á The Mourning Wars by Karen Steinmetz ¼ The Mourning Wars was a good book overall, but at times it got very slow It s about a Puritian girl named Eunice whose village is raided by Native Americans She is adopted into an important family, and from there it is about whether she will stay with the people who adopted her, or try to return to her old life with her father I liked it except for a few minor details that didn t matter but just bothered me First, on the cover, it says Raised a Mohawk This bothered me because at no point in the book were the people called Mohawks Of course, this makes no difference in the story, but it bothered me because I kept expecting another tribe to steal her again.
Second, I hated how Eunice A onote and the others started calling each other by their baptismal names Marguerite and Francois Based On True Events, The Mourning Wars Is A Gripping, Powerful, And Utterly Memorable Historical Novel In , Mohawk Indians Attacked The Frontier Village Of Deerfield, Massachusetts, Killing And Kidnapping , Including John Williams, A Puritan Minister And Prize Hostage, And His ChildrenThis Is Eunice S Remarkable Story, Fictionalized But Based On Meticulous Research, About A Seven Year Old Girl S Separation From Her Family, Harrowing March To Canada, Gradual Acceptance Of Her New Native American Life, And Ultimate Decision At To Marry An Indian And Reject Her Stern Father S Pleadings To Return To The Fold I enjoy historical fiction and this story does not disappoint When 7 year old Eunice is captured along with most of her family, she is thrust into a new world Her young memories fade and resurface as she becomes enfolded into her new family and valued in ways that are not permitted in her old life She embraces the Native ways, comes to love her Mohawk family and even becomes a Catholic, becoming herself as a result of these layers of experience An excellent story resting on historical details.
In spite of the awful cover, this is a book to consider reading and rereading We ve seen plenty of child abducted by Indians stories over the years, and many of them are still assigned in schools Steinmetz does extensive research to follow the true life case of a little girl named Eunice who was taken by a Canadian tribe and eventually grew up to accept their ways and the Catholic faith of the local missionary and marry into the community The story is gripping, and the characters realistic without the book boiling down to the usual white people bad, Native American good tropes A meaningful and interesting read B The Mourning Wars was a good book overall, but at times it got very slow It s about a Puritian girl named Eunice whose village is raided by Native Americans She is adopted into an important family, and from there it is about whether she will stay with the people who adopted her, or try to return to her old life with her father I liked it except for a few minor details that didn t matter but just bothered me First, on the cover, it says Raised a Mohawk This bothered me because at no point in the book were the people called Mohawks Of course, this makes no difference in the story, but it bothered me because I kept expecting another tribe to steal her again.
Second, I hated how Eunice A onote and the others started calling each other by their baptismal names Marguerite and Francois Born a puritan.
Raised a mohawk Sounds good, right I like dry historical fiction, and while the setting was nicely written, none of the characters were interesting Maybe someone with the attention span of a grown up could have finished it.
Born a puritan.
Raised a mohawk Sounds good, right I like dry historical fiction, and while the setting was nicely written, none of the characters were interesting Maybe someone with the attention span of a grown up could have finished it.
One Sentence Review I d have told you that you can t write this kind of novel any, but Steinmetz does a fairly decent job without having to resort to black and white characterizations.
Based on a true story of a girl named Eunice whose family was captured by a tribe of Native Americans I found the story intriguing, but I found the character too distant for me.
This was a very good historical novel I really enjoyed Eunice A onote s journey from Puritan child to Canienga woman Highly recommended.
Enjoyed this one a lot Writing style was occasionally stiff, but the story was very engrossing Full review to follow Interesting and better than expected.
In 1704, seven year old Eunice Williams is growing up in the Puritan community of Deerfield, Massachusetts where her father is the reverend when she is captured by Mohawk men during an Indian raid Nearly everyone from Deerfield ends up separated Eunice and her friend JoAnna are taken by the same group and marched for weeks until they arrive at a Mohawk settlement in Canada There the girls are split up, Eunice being handed over to a family within the tribe who had lost their only daughter Eunice sees little else as an option but to settle into her new life among the Mohawk people Given the new name A onote, she is fed well, given warm, comfortable clothing, and even a pet dog JoAnna is taken in by another family and renamed Gentiyo Gentiyo finds that she really like I enjoy historical fiction and this story does not disappoint When 7 year old Eunice is captured along with most of her family, she is thrust into a new world Her young memories fade and resurface as she becomes enfolded into her new family and valued in ways that are not permitted in her old life She embraces the Native ways, comes to love her Mohawk family and even becomes a Catholic, becoming herself as a result of these layers of experience An excellent story resting on historical details.

KAREN STEINMETZ lives in Grandview, New York.